On Photography and Art

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People enjoy photography I think because it is a challenge. If it was easy to produce an exceptional photograph every time you pressed the shutter, no one would be interested in it.

There are mysteries. There are problems to solve. There are unknowns. There is luck and there is error.

But what separates good photographers from poor ones is effort. Good photographers are the ones who are always working. They are the ones who are possessed. They are the ones who go to bed at night thinking about the next image, and thinking about how they need to change themselves to get to where they want to be.

And there is this zen in photography where you just see. You notice things that others don’t. You are often overwhelmed with imagery…with light…with shadows and contrast and colour and form. You are consumed with geometry and finding a poetic order to something without it being any where near perfect.

Yet even with all these things that are enough to drive you mad, a camera in the hand can set you free. It can release you from self awareness. It can unburden you from rule and restraint.

And the mind of an artist is a very strange thing. We think we’re starting to grasp something until we come to terms with knowing nothing. For every question, there is another question. And just like for every thing we think is true, the opposite is often also true.

The ultimate zen though is being free – free from too much thought…free from technology…free from constraint…free from worry about what others may think…and free from needing any acknowledgement that what you’re doing is valid. That’s when art happens.

Be free. And and enjoy the art of the image. That’s all that matters.

 

Happy Shooting,

 

Doug

New Book

Conversations Without Colour is a book of black and white photography that places an emphasis on getting the reader to slow down and consider the different elements of an image. Not just a visual treat for the viewer, this book is also a gem for anyone interested in the art of photography.

– Chapters: Subject, Essence, Edge, Render, Moment, Focus, Truth

– 111 photographs

– Intriguing text about the art of photography

The book contains a large variety of photographs from different locations, some as far away as Halifax Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and Maui, Hawaii. No matter if you’re interested in landscapes, street scenes, crowds, wildlife, forests, storefronts, or portraits, there is something in this book for you.

At 8 by 10 inches in size, the book is perfect for your collection or on your coffee table. The paper used in the book is the highest quality stock available.

Link:

http://www.blurb.ca/bookstore/invited/6586054/7242156bb99274ddde8b98b26ac6dc8ea8008ffc

 

 

The Next Photograph

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The Next Photograph

 

Inside looking out,

the dirty windows seem to dampen the spirit

like the five day rain.

 

Perhaps it’s a time to ponder.

Perhaps it’s a time to dream.

 

I’ll fix another cup of tea

and add another line to my book.

 

But I have to ask,

“Is it from outside or inside

that I really need to look?”

 

 

 

 

~ Keech, 2013

One Day in November

It’s funny how when you look back at some of your earliest work you can only now grasp what it was you were trying to capture. Back then perhaps, it didn’t really mean to much to you as an image, yet there was some strange reason to hold on to it…a reason you couldn’t quite fully come to terms with.

 

Image

 

Some images need time to incubate. This photo entitled “One Day in November” was one of those images for me. Does it evoke some kind of feeling of pensiveness, being alone, or is it more symbolic? I don’t know. But it is one that I have found myself coming back to to look at time and time again.

 

Photography is often one of those arts that can often contain an element of something that you just can’t quite put your finger on. Something that keeps us looking. Something that keeps us searching. That’s why it’s so great. And, the longer I do this, the more I realize there’s much more to discover, much more to figure out. But I have learned that it isn’t about cameras and not necessarily about sharp images.